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KINGDOM

GRANT

 

 

KINGDOM

GRANT

 


 


 




 

 

 

 


  I’m sure we can all agree that drug abuse is just a symptom of a bigger problem.  Sometimes it’s hard to put your finger on just one thing that leads to it. Did someone start on drugs because it was available to them, because they could not cope with a life issue, because they were trying to escape the hopelessness of a circumstance, or because they started partying and escalated into it?  Every life story is an individual one, and we mustn’t forget that environment can play a big role.  Exposure can also be a key element.  Every community has its own character and issues that could be contributing to their youths’ drug addictions. Are contributing influences those of poverty, gangs, single parent homes, fatherless homes, abusive parents, absent parents?  To eliminate or prevent drug abuse means to address the root causes in communities, in families and in individuals, and those could be many.  We are also confronted with the difficulty that drugs are big business, and their use is promoted by dealers who make their living from peddling!  So any program geared to deal with drug abuse must be multi-faceted and the battle must be fought on a number of fronts.  The best cure, of course, is prevention, so, among other things, we need to equip all our young people with the knowledge and tools to resist its insidious grasp.  The Sword of the Spirit and the Word of God are of course the best tools we can equip our young people with.

But for those who have fallen to it’s lie and are now struggling for their lives, here is a possible plan to restore a broken life.

The Problem of Addicition:

     Professionals today treat substance abuse as a physical problem, when in reality the abuse is a side effect of an emotional wound.  When the physical addiction is gone, the emotional wound still remains, and the urge to abuse substances returns.  It is a sad case of misdiagnosis, and unfortunately a staggering number of addicts who have been through treatment will relapse.  The SAHDA did a study in clinics and treatment centers and found that over 55% of new admitees had been through a rehab program in the past.  That percentage only reflects the number of patients who reported their previous treatments and only in those who came back for more treatment.  Imagine how many more of them that had treatment, went back to using drugs and did not come back for more help!  That is staggering!  The conclusion is, conventional treatment does not work.  Not by a long shot.  It seems to me that a proper analogy for current drug treatment is to mop up a floor while the faucet is still running. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 






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